Epic FAQ and 10 types of presets you need to know – Part 1

We all want those proven ways to make life easier.

We all want to feel good about our photos.

So we seek the easy fix. So many people believe that presets and instagram filters are the win they are looking for. But they’re wrong.
Before you go thinking I’m anti- presets and filters. You couldn’t be further from the truth. I love presets and know how much time they can save you when used correctly. The problem is that when people think presets they think filters for editing. That’s not what today is all about.

What are presets?

The preset functionality in any application allows you to save multiple settings and adjustments in the program so that you can reuse those settings and adjustments in the future with a click of a button.

I’m sure you can imagine this is highly effective in saving you time and assisting you to be consistent in your workflow.

These CAN be a massive timesaver. However, this is a great misunderstanding out what types of presets you need to have.

What are the different types of presets?

Lots of people think presets are just like a filter that you add to your photo. That is only about adjusting the photo. But that’s not the case.

There are many types of presets that get overlooked.

Import presets- My favourite – this saves me loads of time

Metadata Presets – allow you to pre-determine what you’d like to include within the metadata of your image, such as your copyright, camera info etc.

Naming – help me stay consistently organised.

Develop – the most misunderstood – see my live on this.

Local adjustments – I love this for quick adjustments like teeth whitening and eye sharpening.

Creative profiles –

This is like putting your camera in landscape mode, and the camera makes a few adjustments for you, but you still have the full editing power of RAW.

Export presets- Saves me loads of time and keeps me consistent.

Watermarks – No thought required. All set up and saved.

How presets work?

Once you’ve grasped what you want to do, simply save it a preset and the program will remember what you wanted to do and how you did it. Allowing you; with a simple click return to what you already know works.

Should we use presets?

Yes, as I said above. I’m a massive fan of presets, but you should only use them when you know it’s applicable and appropriate to do so. Very few presets will do everything you need. It’s much more likely that you need a combination of different types of presets or to create your own.

If you’re interested in learning how to create your own presets. Sign up here to join my waiting list for this training.

Create your own Presets
Join the waiting list for my next live training

Can I use presets on my mobile?

Of course, there are numerous apps out there. But like I said before, choose wisely.

My recommendation will always be Lightroom CC. The app is free, but if you want to add your own and be consistent. I recommend you get Lightroom for your desktop. This allows you to sync your desktop presets to your mobile app. Nice!

How to add presets to Lightroom cc?

From the menu bar, choose File > Import Profiles & Presets.

In the Import dialog that appears, browse to the required path and select profiles or presets that you want to import. 

Click Import.

Yes it's that easy.

How to create your own type of presets?

  • Select the Develop Module in Lightroom
  • At the top of the navigator on the left-hand side panel, you’ll see an option that says “Presets.” Here you’ll find a series of presets already housed within Lightroom.
  • Click the “+” sign to add a new preset.
  • A menu will pop up and direct you to select which settings you’d like for your preset. If you’re just getting started and aren’t sure what to select, choose them all. You can make adjustments later or create variations on another preset you create.
  • Choose an applicable name for your preset.
  • Scroll down and find the option that reads “User Presets.” This is where you’ll find your new preset.
  • Select another photo in Lightroom.
  • Choose the preset in your user preset list. Your preset will apply to the photo.

If you have anymore questions about presets, drop them below. I've love to answer them.

10+ types of presets you need to know